Dallas VideoFest presents Women and the Movies They Make

WMMlogo_rectangle_preview

We got a chance to talk to the amazing film essayist, professor and academic writer Shilyh Warren this week about DVF’s latest installment: Women and the Movies They Make in an interview she kindly granted on Monday. She granted us great insight to her process of curation.

Shilyh talked to us about some of the best films presented in this upcoming March 25th program taking place at Alamo Drafthouse Richardson which includes all the amazing women you haven’t yet heard about who  . . .  surprise, surprise have been making awesome films all along, well before the manipulative nature of Hollywood (and many other “official structures” for that matter) was exposed in the midst of the #metoo scandal.

In this clip Warren elaborates on Palestinan filmmaker Mona Hatoum’s work that is a series of letters to her mother as she wrestles with the concept of diaspora.

 

Presented by Dallas Video Fest in part with Women in Film Dallas and Flicks by Chicks. Special thanks to Women Make Movies, the Texas Commission on the Arts, and the Dallas Film Commission. This organization is funded in part by the City of Richardson through the City of Richardson Cultural Arts Commission.

 

Assistant Professor of Aesthetics and Film Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas, Shilyh Warren’s essays on documentary and feminist filmmaking have appeared in Camera Obscura, South Atlantic Quarterly, Signs, Jump Cut, and Mediascape. She is also the co-editor of a special feature on feminist pedagogy and cinematic violence for Films for the Feminist Classroom.

ShilyhWarren

The Feetles play DVF30 AltFiction along with many other astounding acts.

It seems like in the age of Trump, it’s hard to tell which sock is right and which sock is left.  It’s as if the 1960’s reached out to tinge our present decade, but none of it is the good part where civil rights happen or women get liberated. It’s the same blather over and over again.

Who care’s if they’re legitimized? These sad men who can’t handle legitimate protest are all just trolls on Twitter in the end.

So what’s a person to do when every day civil liberty is eroding? Seek comfort, support and distraction. Live as though you’re forgetting that Nuclear Winter is just around the corner. Isn’t that what we did then?

Maybe we should all be after a better sense of nostalgia.

Like those invoked by parodies of sock puppets who are quite glad their lady love has washed them.

Just ask Bart Weiss, artistic director of VideoFest for his inspiration.

“There’s lots of talk today about alternative facts and political narratives. The line between fact and fiction in life and in cinema is blurring.

Filmmakers are making TV; TV shows become feature films. Who can even define what the idea of television is anymore with networks along with the gamut of streaming services? DVF30’s AltFiction Fest devotes the weekend to ways of telling stories on large screens and small – film and TV and web – mixing media and mediums,” said Bart Weiss, founder and artistic director of Dallas VideoFest.

The narratives that make up the majority of AltFiction Fest explore this moment in time at the intersection between media and how cinema artists can create original work in this new world.

“Over the 4 days at the Angelika, a great palace of traditional cinema exhibition, AltFiction Fest features new works from local and international filmmaker telling unique stories, working the edges and sometimes the centers of this world,” said Weiss.

See THE FEETLES, a short produced in the Dallas area by the ever-growing in popularity “Sock Puppet Parody” YouTube collective, and many other offerings ready to lift your spirits at Dallas VideoFest #DVF30AltFiction. 

Saving Brinton chronicles Michael Zahs’ journey to preserve cinematic history.

SavingBrintonWeb

A small-town Iowan collector cum hoarder, Michael Zahs, attempts to attract as much attention as he can to a treasure trove of American cinematic history in Saving Brinton — a documentary that chronicles his journey to share the contents of a box carelessly marked “Brinton Crap” found in a basement of a farmhouse in 1981.

When it comes to works that document a fanatic’s concern with details, that other people might have a harder time grasping (think Strad Style) this offering blends some awkward moments of rejection with moments of great reception from just the right audiences.

Tommy Haines and John Richard create a straightforward storytelling style makes this documentary one that delivers the facts with just a bit of wry humor.

The technology presented in Saving Brinton is fascinating. There are color projections and moving pieces that seem almost too advanced and complicated for the 1800’s that the Brintons were screening for sold out audiences across the American Heartland — that in many cases were a person or town’s first exposure to the moving picture.

But, unfortunately for Zahs, it seems people aren’t as interested in the minutiae of Victorian history as they used to be, unless they’re academics or film fanatics. The film literally depicts someone walking out on him as he’s explaining the painstaking detail of a Brinton production. Perhaps it’s a bit passe to be in love with the fruits of colonization that excluded other groups these days, even when they’re technological advancements. Maybe it’s just hard to capture an Iowan’s imagination.

I don’t get it. I’m certainly fascinated.

Zahs eventually makes some traction with the public once he screens the films at the oldest continually-operating cinema in the world — where they originally once did. That’s a long journey for films that almost made it to a dump if it weren’t for his intervention.

This offering out of Northland Films can currently be seen in Texas on Saturday 10/7 as part of Dallas VideoFest DocuFest.