John Cleese to be presented with Ernie Kovacs Award at Texas Theatre on December 4

Tickets $35+: https://www.prekindle.com/promo/id/530585115385351831

The nature of physical comedy over the intellectual and paired with the intellectual is, in theatrical history, generally paired with messaging meant to effect the working or less educated classes.

But this specific point of reference whether it is found in the Globe Theatre’s repertoire or the spectacle that entered all of our homes at the apex of the mid-century does not assume this form of comedy is declasse.

The physical effect of comedy, as tragedy or trope informative of natures, states, and conditions humanity might find deterrent when placed on the body as presented in a public performative space, operates as mirror for the individual among axes that may in some respects be described as an interactive, ideological space between the Panopticon and the Synopticon for as much as Foucault and Mathieson are worth without Marshall McLuhan’s elaboration on the Medium and the Message.

Buffoonery has much to teach the individual that cannot learn from a simple wagging eyebrow.

But now for something completely different: (that is actually quite the same)

Over the years, VideoFest has only shown short snippets of Ernie Kovacs’ work.

This year hosts of the Kovacs’ Centennial and Dallas VideoFest will present a full evening of Ernie Kovacs television work the night before the Award Event.

Celebrate the Centennial of the birth of offbeat comedy genius, Ernie Kovacs, with this hilarious retrospective of his greatest live gags on early television in the 1950s along with his career highlights, which have inspired the likes of Pee-wee Herman, Kids in the Hall, Amy Sedaris, Mike Nesmith, and Monty Python.

Hosted by Dallas VideoFest’s artistic director: Bart Weiss, Ernie Kovacs archivist: Ben Model, and Josh Mills, the son of Ernie’s wife, Edie Adams:

Dallas VideoFest 32 presents an evening retrospective of “The Ernie Kovacs Show” on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. at Alamo Drafthouse Cinema – Richardson (100 N Central Expy #14, Richardson). Admission – $5 voucher redeemable for food reserves your seat at Alamo – Richardson.

The following day, VideoFest awards the Ernie Kovacs Award to comedian John Cleese of Monty Python and Fawlty Towers fame, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Texas Theatre (231 W. Jefferson Blvd. – Oak Cliff/Dallas).

Admission – $35+ Tickets available – http://VideoFest.org

Saving Brinton chronicles Michael Zahs’ journey to preserve cinematic history.

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A small-town Iowan collector cum hoarder, Michael Zahs, attempts to attract as much attention as he can to a treasure trove of American cinematic history in Saving Brinton — a documentary that chronicles his journey to share the contents of a box carelessly marked “Brinton Crap” found in a basement of a farmhouse in 1981.

When it comes to works that document a fanatic’s concern with details, that other people might have a harder time grasping (think Strad Style) this offering blends some awkward moments of rejection with moments of great reception from just the right audiences.

Tommy Haines and John Richard create a straightforward storytelling style makes this documentary one that delivers the facts with just a bit of wry humor.

The technology presented in Saving Brinton is fascinating. There are color projections and moving pieces that seem almost too advanced and complicated for the 1800’s that the Brintons were screening for sold out audiences across the American Heartland — that in many cases were a person or town’s first exposure to the moving picture.

But, unfortunately for Zahs, it seems people aren’t as interested in the minutiae of Victorian history as they used to be, unless they’re academics or film fanatics. The film literally depicts someone walking out on him as he’s explaining the painstaking detail of a Brinton production. Perhaps it’s a bit passe to be in love with the fruits of colonization that excluded other groups these days, even when they’re technological advancements. Maybe it’s just hard to capture an Iowan’s imagination.

I don’t get it. I’m certainly fascinated.

Zahs eventually makes some traction with the public once he screens the films at the oldest continually-operating cinema in the world — where they originally once did. That’s a long journey for films that almost made it to a dump if it weren’t for his intervention.

This offering out of Northland Films can currently be seen in Texas on Saturday 10/7 as part of Dallas VideoFest DocuFest.

 

Summer with the Dallas Skyline: James Wallace, Alamo Drafthouse Creative Manager, Has Crafted a Season of Awesome.

We recently got the opportunity to probe James Wallace’s brain about Alamo DFW’s
new summer lineup of fantastic events at the Vetted Well, his thoughts about Free Fire (and the Director’s Q&A), the MST3K showing with Frank Conniff and Trace Beauleiu, and some other items. It looks like he and his teams have gone out of their way to craft some really fun times.

Kate: So, it looks like we can look forward to a summer full of patio-themed entertainment events. I think the inspiration there is obvious, but if there’s something specific there, I’d love to discuss it. What’s your favorite aspect of the Vetted Well’s patio? It’s quite nice. 

James: Well, it’s hard to ignore that beautiful view of the skyline! I think that’s everyone’s favorite aspect so any excuse to have fun stuff going on outside when the weather is nice is a bonus.

Beyond that, it’s just coming up with creative ways to use the Vetted Well space outside of just being a place that people may grab a drink before or after their movie.

That was the concept of Vetted Well from the inception really – to go beyond just the movie theater lobby bar and have a multipurpose entertainment space that was connected to the theater and could tie into events there but could also exist on its own with its own programming. And it’s been great to see that happen; where people just come to Vetted Well for the karaoke rooms or Geeks Who Drink or Outdoor Comedy or any of the other signature programming we have had going on up there.

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The Vetted Well is a great place for cocktails, brunch, karaoke, or just an overall good time.

I’d say our crowning jewel in the new programming is Funky Brunch (at least that’s my favorite!) and that inspiration came out of just trying to come up with a really fun and unique brunch on Sundays. Dallas is such a brunch city with a pretty competitive market for it, and everyone who does it has their hook. So we had to have ours, besides of course having great brunch offerings. I have to admit that the concept really started with the punny name and pretty naturally and quickly developed out of that.

That theme really informed the inspiration for the menu and the vibe. Then we found the perfect DJs for it in PICNICTYME & Cory Kilduff who are not only Funk & Soul aficionados but spin vinyl. And then it all came together!


Kate: Free Fire is a film I’ve been looking forward to for a long time. Good to see you guys have set up an awesome Q&A. Are there any burning questions you’re looking forward to asking Ben Wheatley?

James: Me too! Yeah, you know Ben Wheatley is one of those filmmakers that I see as kind of part of the Alamo Drafthouse extended family. I remember when his first feature DOWN TERRACE has its world premiere at Fantastic Fest 2009 (Alamo’s film festival in Austin).

I remember seeing the film there and just being blown away and so excited to see what else he was going to do. And here we are eight-years-later with KILL LIST, SIGHTSEERS, A FIELD IN ENGLAND (which Drafthouse Films released), HIGH-RISE, and now FREE FIRE.Looking at his filmography, I think he just makes the kind of films that we’re all about at Alamo. And FREE FIRE looks to be very much that type of movie. Not to mention it’s from A24 and we’re all such huge fans of the movies they release.

I do have a lot of questions I’d love to ask him but firstly I think I would have to ask him how it felt shooting a shirtless Tim League with paintballs.

Kate: It looks like we have a lot to look forward to when Frank Conniff and Trace Beauleiu come to visit Richardson at the end of the month. Do you have a favorite MST3K moment?

James: Oh man, you have no idea how excited I am that we get to have The Mads at Richardson! I mean it’s Dr. Clayton Forrester and TV’s Frank live and in-person riffing in the theater! And it couldn’t be better timing with the premiere of the new MST3K on Netflix. 

I have so many fond memories of watching the original run on Comedy Central when I was a kid and then later on the Sci-Fi Channel in my formative teenage years as a budding comedy nerd and genre film nerd. But there’s one that sticks out and, at the risk of being boring, I have to say it’s the episode with MANOS: HANDS OF FATE. That was the moment that my eyes were really open to the world of “best worst movies” that would inform so much of my tastes as a fan of those gems of obscure ’60s/’70s genre movies.

Side Note: Someone should do a movie mashup called MANOS: HANDS OF FATE OF THE FURIOUS

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Tickets available in advance at https://drafthouse.com/dfw.


Kate: Are there any films on your radar you consider a Drafthouse must-see?

James: Well, there are the obvious big ones coming next month – GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2… ALIEN: COVENANT….

But in terms of indie fare that might not be on people’s radars, there are a few in the next couple of months that I’m really excited about – IT COMES AT NIGHT, BABY DRIVER, and A GHOST STORY. COLOSSAL is also great and now playing at an Alamo Drafthouse near you!